There is an old adage “everyone has a book in them” and while we appreciate that some may need more help than others in structuring their writing, Amazon‘s latest change to its royalty system is certainly likely to encourage some to take the plunge.

Amazon has announced an enhanced 70 per cent royalty for UK authors and publishers creating for its Kindle platform, allowing budding authors and publishers to get their books onto the ebook market and take a very big slice of the profits. Helping push sales of its own Kindle reader Amazon is pushing its Digital Text Platform (DTP) which allows authors to upload their books and make money from the books sold to Kindle and other ebook device owners that can use Amazon’s system – there are also iphone apps, android apps and desktop apps to read Kindle books.

Previously, the royalties on offer were still an enticing 65% but the increased 5% brings Amazon in line with the 70/30 split that Apple applies to sales of iPhone Apps – although Apple also make other charges. The 70% also brings the UK in line with Amazon US which has been operating at that level for a number of months.

So think you have a book in you? Amazon’s requirements are:

  • An Amazon account – you can login to submit via the DTP admin panel.
  • The author or publisher-supplied list price must be between £1.49 and £6.99.
  • The list price must be at least 20 percent below the lowest list price for any physical version of the book.
  • The title is made available for sale in all countries for which the author or the publisher has rights.
  • The title will be included in the Kindle Store in various electronic formats, such as text-to-speech – features that will grow as Amazon adds more functionality to Kindle and the Amazon.co.uk Kindle Store.

Delivery costs are based on file size, and pricing is set at £0.10/MB – the average size is 368Kb so per unit the average is £0.04. So for a ebook sold at a £5.99 (VAT exclusive) the author would earn £4.17 per book sold.

If all the above sounds a bit too restrictive for you there is a standard DTP royalty option which is not quite as lucrative (35% so on a £5.99 book an author would take £2.10) but would still offer good visibility in the Kindle store which appears to be growing every day.

If you fancy having a go why not check out Amazon’s very own guide to publishing on the Kindle – available in Kindle format from their site. For those that do see it through we’d love to hear from you and have a look at what you’ve published too.