More than half of workers now use their mobile phones in preference to their office landline marking a new era of remote and flexible working, research has revealed. The survey has found that 53 per cent of staff conduct more calls on their mobile, signalling the end of the desk phone.

It also revealed that mobile phone usage has now become so commonplace in UK businesses that almost two-thirds of employees (64 per cent) said their jobs demand them to take out hours of calls on their mobiles.

Mobile phone usage is evidently the way forward for businesses, especially with major events like the Olympics impacting on our working habits year. Flexible working is on the rise and people don’t just work from nine until five any longer.

The research showed that as a consequence staff are taking calls in increasingly unusual places; almost seven out of 10 workers (68 per cent) admitted taking business calls in cafes, with 58 per cent dialling up in restaurants, and 46 per cent in bars. 17 per cent said they had taken work calls at a wedding reception and 11 per cent on the golf course.

The survey also revealed a trend for home and mobile working, with more than one in five respondents (21 per cent) working from home at least once a week. More than two-thirds of them (68 percent) said they used their mobiles to do this, compared with just four per cent who used a home phone only.

Business is mobile these days so people need to be available – and have more access to information – when needed. This is why I advise firms to have measures in place like mobile call recording and integration with CRM systems. Calls need to be logged, archived and available for reporting and analytics, so that key business information isn’t lost.

Companies have monitored web usage and email for years, but increasingly there is a need to track employee telephone activity too – on mobiles and landlines alike.

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Neil Hammerton

Neil Hammerton

Neil Hammerton, the CEO of Natterbox, began his career with an apprenticeship with BT Research Labs. After gaining an HND in Electrical & Electronic Engineering, Neil successfully ran his own commercial cleaning company before selling up and pursuing his passion of hang-gliding, a love that saw him represent Great Britain in 1994. Neil then set up an IT reselling business that specialised in Network Security, which saw him introduce a phenomenally successful internet security product range into Europe, supplying to several million end users. In 2003, Neil co-founded Email Systems Limited with Jim Page – a business they grew to have offices in the UK, Sweden, Holland and Australia before selling to Webroot Inc in 2007. Neil was then VP of EMEA for Webroot until 2009, responsible for growth in that region as well as assisting in the continued development of the ‘SaaS’ security services. 2009 saw the birth of Natterbox, based on a vision to revolutionise voice communications.

Neil Hammerton, the CEO of Natterbox, began his career with an apprenticeship with BT Research Labs. After gaining an HND in Electrical & Electronic Engineering, Neil successfully ran his own commercial cleaning company before selling up and pursuing his passion of hang-gliding, a love that saw him represent Great Britain in 1994. Neil then set up an IT reselling business that specialised in Network Security, which saw him introduce a phenomenally successful internet security product range into Europe, supplying to several million end users. In 2003, Neil co-founded Email Systems Limited with Jim Page – a business they grew to have offices in the UK, Sweden, Holland and Australia before selling to Webroot Inc in 2007. Neil was then VP of EMEA for Webroot until 2009, responsible for growth in that region as well as assisting in the continued development of the ‘SaaS’ security services. 2009 saw the birth of Natterbox, based on a vision to revolutionise voice communications