In the first half of 2010, 14 percent of small and medium enterprises reported using cloud computing services, and another 10 percent reported plans to deploy cloud-based services. About 38 percent of small to medium sized enterprises – SMEs – with fewer than 20 employees use or plan to use cloud solutions in the next six months. Just 17 percent of organizations with between 20 and 99 employees have such plans, while 22 percent of organisations with more than 100 employees aim to do so.

These findings don’t exactly surprise me. I have long argued that the small enterprises will drive cloud adoption because they have most to gain and can act quickly. Smaller businesses deciding that they want to be free of the Microsoft Office handcuffs can swiftly move webside to Zoho or Google Apps while larger companies struggle to take advantage of emerging cloud based services, the reluctance probably driven by the IT department which can see its staff being decimated.

My own “day job” organisation is stuck with the abomination that is Internet Explorer 6 because it has too many legacy applications piggy backing on it that won’t work with more up to date browsers.

The Spiceworks survey lobbied 1,500 IT professionals at small and medium enterprises with fewer than 1,000 employees. The survey also revealed that SMEs in emerging markets lead the pack. 41 percent of small and medium businesses in Latin America/South America (LASA) and 35 percent of SMBs in the Asia/Pacific region are adopting cloud services. This is well ahead of the 24 percent of SMBs in North America and 19 percent in Europe that are adopting cloud services.

The biggest non surprise in the survey was the news that technology companies are adopting cloud services at a faster pace. 34 percent of SMEs in the tech sector use or are planning to use cloud services. Companies in the services sector (such as finance, HR, consulting) are using or planning to deploy the cloud at a rate of 22 percent. Most other industries trail closely behind with 20 percent adoption rates.

In the first half of 2010, 14 percent of small and medium enterprises reported using cloud computing services, and another 10 percent reported plans to deploy cloud-based services. About 38 percent of small to medium sized enterprises – SMEs – with fewer than 20 employees use or plan to use cloud solutions in the next six months. Just 17 percent of organizations with between 20 and 99 employees have such plans, while 22 percent of organisations with more than 100 employees aim to do so.

These findings don’t exactly surprise me. I have long argued that the small enterprises will drive cloud adoption because they have most to gain and can act quickly. Smaller businesses deciding that they want to be free of the Microsoft Office handcuffs can swiftly move webside to Zoho or Google Apps while larger companies struggle to take advantage of emerging cloud based services, the reluctance probably driven by the IT department which can see its staff being decimated.

My own “day job” organisation is stuck with the abomination that is Internet Explorer 6 because it has too many legacy applications piggy backing on it that won’t work with more up to date browsers.

The Spiceworks survey lobbied 1,500 IT professionals at small and medium enterprises with fewer than 1,000 employees. The survey also revealed that SMEs in emerging markets lead the pack. 41 percent of small and medium businesses in Latin America/South America (LASA) and 35 percent of SMBs in the Asia/Pacific region are adopting cloud services. This is well ahead of the 24 percent of SMBs in North America and 19 percent in Europe that are adopting cloud services.

The biggest non surprise in the survey was the news that technology companies are adopting cloud services at a faster pace. 34 percent of SMEs in the tech sector use or are planning to use cloud services. Companies in the services sector (such as finance, HR, consulting) are using or planning to deploy the cloud at a rate of 22 percent. Most other industries trail closely behind with 20 percent adoption rates.