How to Take Business Advantage of The Collapse: The Establishment of Solar Farm near Notorious Chernobyl Site.

technology
business
#1

For many years, the name Chernobyl was waking up bad memories for the population that was born when the disastrous accident happened in 1986. During testing in the early hours of the morning, on the 26th of April 1986, the fourth reactor of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant exploded, flooding the surrounding area with lethal radiation.

As the days and months went by, the death toll was rising, making it one of the most devastating accidents in modern times. Several years ago, the evacuated zone around the power plant was opened to the public. Companies like Gamma Travel conducted daily trips through Pripyat enabling people to see the city.

After burying the fourth reactor to prevent additional leaks, the remaining three reactors continued generating power for over a decade. At the beginning of the new millennium, the reactors were shut down, leaving the place even more deserted.

A new kind of story surrounding Chernobyl hit the spotlight. In October 2018, Solar Chernobyl launched a photovoltaic plant built in the near vicinity of the deadly number 4 reactor. The entire project cost over 1 million dollars and spread out on an area of 1.6 hectares. Currently, the plant can produce 1-megawatt power or as experts estimate that can satisfy power needs of around 2000 homes.

Now you ask yourself: who would build something there and why? There are several reasons for that.

The first reason is the price of the land. If we take into consideration the fact that there is no way to that area to be inhabitable in the recent future, the Ukrainian government is selling the area extremely cheap. Since the land is a big part of the investment price, investors would be more than happy to save money on the land.

The price of the land is one advantage for investors, but the purchase price of electricity is another. The Ukrainian government is prepared to buy the electricity for prices up to 50% higher than in other countries in Europe.

The third reason for building a solar farm in Pripyat is the infrastructure. If you take into consideration that the Chernobyl power plant was intended to produce electricity for households, then setting up a solar farm there would reduce the investors costs for setting up and connecting to the power grid. In this case, there is no need for that, as the farm will need to be “hooked up” to the existing installation from the power plant.

The Ukrainian government starts off with only a small portion of area sold to an investor for solar farms. Initially, they intended to have over 6000 acres of solar farms. After losing two solar farms in Crimea to Russia and the gas disputes they have with them, Ukraine is more determined to advance its renewable energy source.

Conclusion

For many years, Ukrainians and pretty much the rest of the world looked on Pripyat as the happy little town that Chernobyl turned into a ghost town. Even though that is true, recent events and the decision by the Ukrainian government put Pripyat back in the spotlight.

For many years, the name Chernobyl was waking up bad memories for the population that was born when the disastrous accident happened in 1986. During testing in the early hours of the morning, on the 26th of April 1986, the fourth reactor of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant exploded, flooding the surrounding area with lethal radiation.

As the days and months went by, the death toll was rising, making it one of the most devastating accidents in modern times. Several years ago, the evacuated zone around the power plant was opened to the public. Companies like Gamma Travel conducted daily trips through Pripyat enabling people to see the city.

After burying the fourth reactor to prevent additional leaks, the remaining three reactors continued generating power for over a decade. At the beginning of the new millennium, the reactors were shut down, leaving the place even more deserted.

A new kind of story surrounding Chernobyl hit the spotlight. In October 2018, Solar Chernobyl launched a photovoltaic plant built in the near vicinity of the deadly number 4 reactor. The entire project cost over 1 million dollars and spread out on an area of 1.6 hectares. Currently, the plant can produce 1-megawatt power or as experts estimate that can satisfy power needs of around 2000 homes.

Now you ask yourself: who would build something there and why? There are several reasons for that.

The first reason is the price of the land. If we take into consideration the fact that there is no way to that area to be inhabitable in the recent future, the Ukrainian government is selling the area extremely cheap. Since the land is a big part of the investment price, investors would be more than happy to save money on the land.

The price of the land is one advantage for investors, but the purchase price of electricity is another. The Ukrainian government is prepared to buy the electricity for prices up to 50% higher than in other countries in Europe.

The third reason for building a solar farm in Pripyat is the infrastructure. If you take into consideration that the Chernobyl power plant was intended to produce electricity for households, then setting up a solar farm there would reduce the investors costs for setting up and connecting to the power grid. In this case, there is no need for that, as the farm will need to be “hooked up” to the existing installation from the power plant.

The Ukrainian government starts off with only a small portion of area sold to an investor for solar farms. Initially, they intended to have over 6000 acres of solar farms. After losing two solar farms in Crimea to Russia and the gas disputes they have with them, Ukraine is more determined to advance its renewable energy source.

Conclusion

For many years, Ukrainians and pretty much the rest of the world looked on Pripyat as the happy little town that Chernobyl turned into a ghost town. Even though that is true, recent events and the decision by the Ukrainian government put Pripyat back in the spotlight.